Good to know things....fun and friendly information to share!

We have gathered some strange butterfly facts to share with you. Amaze your friends! Enjoy!


Butterflies range in size from a tiny 1/8 inch to a huge almost 12 inches.

Butterflies can see red, green, and yellow.

Some people say that when the black bands on the Woolybear caterpillar are wide, a cold winter is coming.

The top butterfly flight speed is 12 miles per hour. Some moths can fly 25 miles per hour.

 


 

 

Monarch butterflies journey from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, a distance of about 2,000 miles, and return to the north again in the spring.

Butterflies cannot fly if their body temperature is less than 86 degrees.

Representations of butterflies are seen in Egyptian frescoes at Thebes, which are 3,500 years old.

 


 

Antarctica is the only continent on which no Lepidoptera have been found.

There are about 24,000 species of butterflies. The moths are even more numerous: about 140,000 species of them were counted all over the world.

The Brimstone butterfly (Gonepterix rhamni) has the longest lifetime of the adult butterflies: 9-10 months. 

 

Some Case Moth caterpillars (Psychidae) build a case around themselves that they always carry with them. It is made of silk and pieces of plants or soil.

The caterpillars of some Snout Moths (Pyralididae) live in or on water-plants.


 


 

The females of some moth species lack wings, all they can do to move is crawl.

The Morgan's Sphinx Moth from Madagascar has a proboscis (tube mouth) that is 12 to 14 inches long to get the nectar from the bottom of a 12 inch deep orchid discovered by Charles Darwin.

Some moths never eat anything as adults because they don't have mouths. They must live on the energy they stored as caterpillars.   


 

Many butterflies can taste with their feet to find out whether the leaf they sit on is good to lay eggs on to be their caterpillars' food or not.

There are more types of insects in one tropical rain forest tree than there are in the entire state of Vermont.

In 1958 Entomologist W.G. Bruce published a list of Arthropod references in the Bible.

The most frequently named bugs from the Bible are:

Locust: 24,

Moth: 11,

Grasshopper: 10,

Scorpion: 10,

Caterpillar: 9, and

Bee: 4.

People eat insects – called "Entomophagy"(people eating bugs) – it has been practiced for centuries throughout Africa, Australia, Asia, the Middle East, and North, Central and South America.

Why?

Because many bugs are both protein-rich and good sources of vitamins, minerals and fats.

YOU can eat bugs! Try the "Eat-A-Bug Cookbook" by David George Gordon , 10 Speed Press. Don’t want to cook them yourself? Go to HotLix for all sorts of insect goodies! My favorites are "Cricket-lickit’s" – a flavored sucker with a real edible cricket inside.

Many insects can carry 50 times their own body weight.

This would be like an adult person lifting two heavy cars full of people.

There are over a million described species of insects. Some people estimate there are actually between 15 and 30 million species.

Most insects are beneficial to people because they eat other insects, pollinate crops, are food for other animals, make products we use (like honey and silk) or have medical uses.

Butterflies and insects have their skeletons on the outside of their bodies, called the exoskeleton. This protects the insect and keeps water inside their bodies so they don’t dry out.

 

Gardens Bring Hummingbirds all summer long!

Attracting Hummingbirds to your Garden


Flowers, Shrubs, Vines and Trees That Will Attract Hummingbirds



Flowers That Attract Hum
mingbirds 


Shrubs, vines and trees can also provide food and cover for hummingbirds. Cover is needed to raise their young and for some protection from the elements and predators.

Flowering Shrubs and Vines that Attract Hummingbirds


Trees that Attract Hummingbirds

Butterfly Nectar Plants

Creating a Butterfly Garden involves planning your garden to attract, retain, and encourage butterfly populations to visit.

You should select a variety of nectar-producing plants (butterfly food plants) with the goal of providing flowers in bloom throughout the season. This will encourage a continuous succession of new visitors to your butterfly garden.


 

Species  Nectar Plants  
Swallowtail  
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Blue Cardinal Flower, Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Butterfly Weed, Garlic Chives, Common Milkweed, Daisy Fleabane, Dames Rocket, Dogbane, Globe
 
     
 
Swallowtail Heliotrope, Joe-Pye Weed, Lantana, Late-flowering Boneset, Liatris, Marigold, Mist Flower, New England Aster, New York Ironweed, Oregano, Oriental Lilies, Petunia, Phlox, Privet, Purple Coneflower, Sweet Pepperbush, Tickseed Sunflower, Tithonia, Verbena, Wild Bergamot , Wingstem,. Zinnia
Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly Bush, Delphinium, Cosmos, Lantana, Oriental Lilies, Phlox, Privet, Wild Bergamot  
Pipevine Swallowtail Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush  
Black Swallowtail Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed. Joe-Pye Weed, Late-flowering Boneset, Oregano, Privet, Purple Coneflower, Wild Bergamot, Zinnia  
Pieridae  
Cabbage White Arugula, Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Butterfly Weed, Collards, Catnip, Common Dandelion, Creeping Wood Sorrel, Common Sage, Daisy Fleabane, Dame's Rocket, Day Lily, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Ground Ivy, Heath Aster, Lantana, Late-flowering Boneset, Lavender, Liatris, Marigold, Mint, Mist Flower, Mustard Greens, New England Aster, Oregano, Radishes, Red Clover, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Sedum (Autumn Joy), Small White Aster, Sweet Pepperbush, Thyme, Tickseed Sunflower, Tithonia, Valerian, White Clover, Winter Cress, Zinnia  
Clouded Sulphur Brazilian Verbena, Common Dandelion, Ground Ivy, Heath Aster, Marigold, Mist Flower, New England Aster, Privet, Purple Coneflower, Showy Coneflower, Tithonia,  
Orange Sulphur Black-Eyed Susan, Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Butterfly Weed, Common Dandelion, Cosmos, Dame's Rocket, Globe Amaranth, Ground Ivy, Heath Aster, Joe-Pye Weed, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, New England Aster, New York Ironweed, Oregano, Purple Coneflower, Red Clover, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Showy Coneflower, Smooth Aster, Tithonia (Mexican Sunflower), White Clover, Zinnia  
Sleepy Orange Abelia, Butterfly Weed, Cosmos, Marigold, Zinnia  
Hairstreaks and Blues  
Eastern Tailed Blue Creeping Wood Sorrel, Dogbane, Garlic Chives, Ground Ivy, Heath Aster, Mist Flower, Oregano, Showy Coneflower, White Clover, Late-flowering Boneset  
Spring and Summer Azure American Holly, Black-Eyed Susan, Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed, Dogbane, Heliotrope, Late-flowering Boneset, Oregano, Mint, Privet, Radishes, Red Clover, Sedum (Autumn Joy), Sweet Pepperbush, White Clover,  
Gray Hairstreak Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Weed, Catnip, Creeping Wood Sorrel, Garlic Chives, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Heath Aster, Lantana, Late-flowering Boneset, Liatris, Mint, Oregano, Salvia, Sedum (Autumn Joy), Showy Coneflower, Small White Aster, Sweet Pepperbush, Tansy, Tickseed Sunflower, Tithonia (Mexican Sunflower), White Clover,  
Red-Banded Hairstreak Boneset, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Garlic Chives, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Heath Aster, Joe-Pye Weed, Late-flowering Boneset, Sedum (Autumn Joy), Showy Coneflower, Small White Aster, Swamp Milkweed, Tall Goldenrod, White Clover,  
Banded Hairstreak Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed, Dogbane, Purple Coneflower  
White M Hairstreak Garlic Chives, Heath Aster, Late-flowering Boneset, Red Clover, Small White Aster.  
Brushfoots  
American Snout Late-flowering Boneset  
Variegated Fritillary Black-Eyed Susan, Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Globe Amaranth, Marigold, Mist Flower, New England Aster, Oregano, Red Clover, Zinnia
 
     
 
Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly Bush, Butterfly Weed, Garlic Chives, Common Milkweed, Dogbane, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, Purple Coneflower, Swamp Milkweed,
Pearl Crescent Black-Eyed Susan, Bloodflower, Butterfly Weed, Common Dandelion, Daisy Fleabane, Globe Amaranth, Garlic Chives, Heath Aster, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, Mist Flower, New England Aster, Sedum (Autumn Joy), Showy Coneflower, Small White Aster, Stiff Goldenrod, Tickseed Sunflower, White Clover, Zinnia  
Monarch Blue Cardinal Flower, Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Butterfly Weed, Common Milkweed, Globe Amaranth, Heath Aster, Heliotrope, Joe-Pye Weed, Lantana, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, Mist Flower, Mustard Greens, New England Aster, New York Ironweed, Oriental Lilies, Showy Coneflower, Smooth Aster, Swamp Milkweed, Tithonia (Mexican Sunflower), Wingstem, Zinnia
 
     
 
Red-Spotted Admiral Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Garlic Chives, Late-flowering Boneset, Mist Flower, Pink Turtlehead, Purple Coneflower,  
Painted Lady Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed, Cosmos, Heliotrope, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, New England Aster, Purple Coneflower, Zinnia
 
     
 
American Lady Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed, Daisy Fleabane, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, Mist Flower, Privet, Purple Coneflower, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Showy Coneflower, White Clover, Zinnia
Red Admiral Abelia, Butterfly Bush, Dogbane, Lantana, Marigold, Mist Flower, Privet,  
Common Buckeye Globe Amaranth, Mist Flower, White Clover,
 
     
 
Question Mark Butterfly Bush, Heliotrope
Eastern Comma Garlic Chives, Dogbane, Privet  
Skippers  
Silver-Spotted Skipper Abelia, Black-Eyed Susan, Blue Berry Bush, Blue Cardinal Flower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Catnip, Dame's Rocket , Garlic Chives, Common Milkweed, Common Sage, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Heliotrope, Joe-Pye Weed, Lantana, Lavender, Mint, Mist Flower, Mountain Laurel, New York Ironweed, Oregano, Oriental Lilies, Phlox, Privet, Radishes, Red Clover, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Showy Coneflower, Smooth Aster, Swamp Milkweed, Verbena, Sweet Pepperbush, Late-flowering Boneset, White Clover, Wild Bergamot and Zinnia.  
Wild Indigo Duskywing Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Ground Ivy, Heliotrope, Lantana, Late-Flowering Boneset, Marigold, Mist Flower, Oregano, Privet, Purple Coneflower, Showy Coneflower, White Clover  
Juvenal's Duskywing Ground Ivy  
Horace’s Duskywing Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Dame's Rocket, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Late-flowering Boneset, Lavender, Marigold, Mist Flower, New England Aster, Purple Coneflower, Showy Coneflower,  
Common Checkered Skipper Globe Amaranth, Heath Aster, Mist Flower, New England Aster, Showy Coneflower  
Hayhurst’s Scallopwing Black-Eyed Susan, Brazilian Verbena, Catnip, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Lantana, Lavender, Marigold, Marjoram, Mist Flower, Showy Coneflower, White Clover  
Common Sootywing Globe Amaranth, Mist Flower,  
Least Skipper Brazilian Verbena, Globe Amaranth, Mist Flower,  
Sachem Black-Eyed Susan, Blue Cardinal Flower, Bloodflower, Brazilian Verbena,Butterfly Bush, Garlic Chives, Common Milkweed, Common Sage, Cosmos, Daisy Fleabane, Dame's Rocket, Dogbane, Globe Amaranth, Heath Aster, Heliotrope, Joe-Pye Weed, Lantana, Late-flowering Boneset, Liatris, Marigold, Mint, Mist Flower, New England Aster, New York Ironweed, Oregano, Phlox, Purple Coneflower, Red Clover, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Sedum (Autumn Joy), Shasta Daisy, Showy Coneflower, Smooth Aster, Stiff Goldenrod, Swamp Milkweed, Sweet Pepperbush, Tansy, Tithonia, Verbena, White Clover, Wingstem, Zinnia  
Peck’s Skipper Brazilian Verbena,Butterfly Bush, Globe Amaranth, Heliotrope, Late-flowering Boneset, Marigold, Mint, Mist Flower, New England Aster, New York Ironweed, Oregano, Red Clover, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Showy Coneflower, Smooth Aster, Swamp Milkweed,  
Zabulon Abelia, Blue Cardinal Flower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed, Common Sage, Delphinium, Globe Amaranth, Heliotrope, Marigold, Mist Flower, Oregano, Oriental Lilies, Petunia, Phlox, Red Marigold, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Showy Coneflower, Verbena, Zinnia  
Clouded Skipper Blue Cardinal Flower, Brazilian Verbena, Day Lily, Globe Amaranth, Heliotrope, Marigold, New England Aster, Salvia "Blue Bedder," Verbena,  
Dun Skipper Brazilian Verbena, Catnip,  Dogbane, Red Clover, Salvia "Blue Bedder,"  
Little Glassywing Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Common Milkweed, Dogbane, Heliotrope, Lantana, Liatris, Oregano, Privet, Purple Coneflower,  
Fiery Skipper Blue Cardinal Flower, Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Garlic Chives, Common Sage, Globe Amaranth, Heath Aster, Heliotrope, Lantana, Marigold, Mist Flower, Oregano, Salvia "Blue Bedder, Tithonia,  
Crossline Skipper Butterfly Bush, Brazilian Verbena  
Tawny-Edged Skipper Brazilian Verbena, Globe Amaranth, Red Clover,  
Southern Broken-Dash Butterfly Bush, Mist Flower  
Ocola Skipper Brazilian Verbena, Butterfly Bush, Globe Amaranth, Marigold, Mist Flower, Wingstem, Zinnia  

It is especially important to have flowers in mid to late summer, when most butterflies are active. Flowers with multiple florets that produce abundant nectar are ideal. Butterfly Bush and Butterfly Weed are some of the most popular flowers used by butterfly gardeners.

Below is a list of favorite food/ nectar plants that will bring enjoyment to both the gardener and the butterfly!

Butterfly Food/ Nectar Plants: What You Need To Know!

While there may be a lot of different butterfly nectar plants available, there are few of these nectar-bearing plants that are at the top of the list. 

The top three nectar bearing food plants that butterflies love are butterfly weedpurple coneflowers and the New England Aster! If you plant all three of these plants, you will definitely be seeing a lot more butterflies in your yard! 4 more top plants are MilkweedMarigoldsOregano and the popular Butterfly bush

One of the biggest things that you need to remember when you are attempting to attract butterflies to your backyard is that you need to have a lot of different flowers for them to choose from.  This way, you will definitely be attracting more than one type of butterfly. 

A great addition to any butterfly garden is rocks as well, this gives a great place for all of the butterflies to stop and rest their wings.

Another great idea is to group the same types of flowers together; this will ensure that the butterflies will have easy access to their favorite flowers!

This article Butterfly Garden Plans (the layout and design) will help you decide where things should go. 

Now that you have yourself a basis of what your butterfly garden should look like and what butterfly nectar bearing plants you should plant, it is now all up to you! 

Just remember some of the tips and tricks discussed in this article and you should have no problems attracting all sorts of butterflies to you garden!

 

These articles are free for you to copy and distribute. Make sure to give www.learnaboutnature.com credit for the article.

Colorado's List of Butterflies. Click each to see the pictures!

The following list of butterflies are found in Colorado. Clicking on the text link will show you a picture of the butterfly and which specific counties in Colorado the butterfly is found in.

Each link also provides more information about the butterfly's identification and life history.  

This will help you decide which Butterfly Nectar Plants and Butterfly Host Plants you will want to plant when you create your butterfly garden.

Simply find which butterflies are in your area, grow the plants the caterpillars like to eat, and plants that adult butterflies feed on!

You can prolong the butterfly's stay in your garden and draw in others by providing both the food and shelter they need.

Brush-footed Butterflies (Nymphalidae)

Admirals and Relatives (Limenitidinae)
'Astyanax' Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis astyanax)
Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis)
Ruddy Daggerwing (Marpesia petreus)
Viceroy (Limenitis archippus)
Weidemeyer's Admiral (Limenitis weidemeyerii)

Emperors (Apaturinae) 
Hackberry Emperor (Asterocampa celtis)

Longwings (Heliconiinae) 
Aphrodite Fritillary (Speyeria aphrodite)
Arctic Fritillary (Boloria chariclea)
Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)
Hydaspe Fritillary (Speyeria hydaspe)
Julia Heliconian (Dryas julia)
Meadow Fritillary (Boloria bellona)
Mormon Fritillary (Speyeria mormonia)
Nokomis Fritillary (Speyeria nokomis)
Northwestern Fritillary (Speyeria hesperis)
Regal Fritillary (Speyeria idalia)
Relict Fritillary (Boloria kriemhild)
Silver-bordered Fritillary (Boloria selene)
Variegated Fritillary (Euptoieta claudia)
Zebra Heliconian (Heliconius charithonius)
Zerene Fritillary (Speyeria zerene)

 

Milkweed Butterflies (Danainae) 
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)
Queen (Danaus gilippus)
Soldier (Danaus eresimus)

 

Snouts (Libytheinae) 
American Snout
 (Libytheana carinenta)

True Brushfoots (Nymphalinae) 
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)
California Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis californica)
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)
Compton Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis vaualbum)
Dotted Checkerspot (Poladryas minuta)
Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma)
Edith's Checkerspot (Euphydryas editha)
Field Crescent (Phyciodes pulchellus)
Fulvia Checkerspot (Thessalia fulvia)
Gillette's Checkerspot (Euphydryas gillettii)
Gorgone Checkerspot (Chlosyne gorgone)
Graphic Crescent (Phyciodes graphica)
Gray Comma (Polygonia progne)
Green Comma (Polygonia faunus)
Hoary Comma (Polygonia gracilis)
Leanira Checkerspot (Thessalia leanira)
Milbert's Tortoiseshell (Aglais milberti)
Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)
Mylitta Crescent (Phyciodes mylitta)
Northern Checkerspot (Chlosyne palla)
Northern Crescent (Phyciodes cocyta)
Painted Crescent (Phyciodes picta)
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)
Pale Crescent (Phyciodes pallida)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
Phaon Crescent (Phyciodes phaon)
Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Variable Checkerspot (Euphydryas chalcedona)
West Coast Lady (Vanessa annabella)


Parnassians and Swallowtails (Papilionidae)

Parnassians (Parnassiinae) 
Clodius Parnassian (Parnassius clodius)
Rocky Mountain Parnassian (Parnassius smintheus)

Swallowtails (Papilioninae) 
Anise Swallowtail (Papilio zelicaon)
Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)
Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes)
Indra Swallowtail (Papilio indra)
Old World Swallowtail (Papilio machaon)
Pale Swallowtail (Papilio eurymedon)
Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)
Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus)
Thoas Swallowtail (Papilio thoas)
Two-tailed Swallowtail (Papilio multicaudata)
Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) 

Courtesy of: Opler, Paul A., Harry Pavulaan, Ray E. Stanford, Michael Pogue, coordinators. 
Butterflies and Moths of North America. Bozeman, MT: Mountain Prairie Information Node.

Butterfly Gardening

 

 

Butterflies are some of the most beautiful and interesting creatures on Earth.

A butterfly garden is an easy way to see more butterflies and to help them, since many natural butterfly habitats have been lost to human activities like building homes, roads and farms.

It is easy to increase the number and variety of butterflies in your yard. Simply grow the plants the caterpillars like to eat, and plants that adult butterflies feed on!

We can help - we have LOTS of informative articles to help you:

Butterfly Nectar Plants (plants adult butterflies like)

Butterfly Host Plants (plants caterpillars like)

Butterfly Gardening by Area (what butterflies live in your area)

Butterfly Garden Plans (the layout and design)

Butterfly Behavior To Watch in the Garden (feeding, basking, etc)

Sprucing Up Your Butterfly Garden (spruce up your existing garden)

Raise Butterflies & Build Them a Home (add butterflies to your garden)