Beautiful words from a past yet very important era!

New Post from the WWrite Blog

 

The Break of Day - Poet Isaac Rosenberg

“Dawn has never recovered from what the Great War did to it,” writes Paul Fussell in The Great War and Modern Memory. This week's post explores the unprecedented notions of dawn in the WWI poetry of British soldier, Isaac Rosenberg, who died on Easter Sunday, 1918. Dawn, an almost-universal symbol for renewal, became one of the most painful times of day for soldiers in the trenches because it revealed the reality of the nightmares that battle brought them in the dark. Don't miss this post on one of the most important, prolific poets of the Great War, Isaac Rosenberg.

http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/articles-posts/4285-isaac-rosenberg.html

Colorado WWI Centennial Commission

Contact: Colorado@worldwar1centennial.org

Commissioners

Chairman: Philip Sneed

Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities,

Executive Director

Betty Jo Brenner,

Colorado Humanities,

Program Coordinator 

Rose Campbell,

Regis University-

Assoc. Dir. of the Center for the Study of War Experience

Daniel Clayton,

Regis University-

Dir. of the Center for the Study of War Experience/ Professor of History

William Convery,

University of Colorado-

Denver, Dept. of History, Former Colorado State Historian

Greg Forster, Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, Volunteer

Joseph Hutchison,

Colorado Poet Laureate

Andrea Maestrejuan,

Metro State University,

Assistant Professor, Dept. of History

Mark McGoff, City of Arvada - Councilmember 


 Partners:

American Numismatic Association,

Douglas Mudd, 

Curator/ Museum Director and Rod Gillis, 

Education Director

Castle Rock Museum

City of Arvada

Colorado Buffalo Soldiers, 

Ann and Fred Applewhite, 

Secretary and Treasurer

Colorado Humanities

Denver Public Library

Denver Film Society, Brit Withey, Artistic Director

Golden Library

Hayden Museum

High Plains Library District -

Centennial Park Branch Library 

Lafayette Library

Loveland Library

Metropolitan State University

Money Museum/ American Numismatic Association

(Colorado Springs)

Platteville Library

Red Rocks Community College,

Linnie Pawlek

Assoc. Professor of History

Regis University- Center for the Study of War Experience


 

University of Denver- University College

 

VFW Post #1 Denver, Michael Mitchell  


 


 Arvada Center Staff Support: 

Kristin Bueb, Exhibition Manager 

Leanne Cadman, 

Assoc. Dir., Corporate and Foundation Relations

Lynne Collins, 

Artistic Director (Plays)

Cynthia DeLarber,

Dir. of Advancement, Communication & Patron Services

Rod Lansberry, 

Producing Artistic Director (Musicals)

Lisa Leafgreen, 

Director of Education

Ashley Machacek, 

School Programs Coordinator

Michelle Osgood, Executive Coordinator

Adam Stolte, Production Manager


 


🙂

From 1966 WE are enjoying Ladybird Johnson's Pay Forward work.

Thousands of billboards vanished after 1965, but hard lobbying by the outdoor advertising industry, 40 years of congressional amendments to the law, and no funding for enforcement left many signs standing.

In 2005, CDOT started notifying business owners along Colorado 17 to take their festive signs down, said CDOT’s Nancy Shanks.

Artwork and pictures were OK, but no text declaring that alligators were ahead, guiding motorists to aliens or offering directions to several commercial hot springs pools.


 

Signs like this are now extinct due to Mrs Lyndon "Ladybird" Johnson, Wife of our late great President Lyndon Johnson!

History of the Highway Beautification Act

 

Some say Colorado 17, the highway that runs north from Alamosa toward Salida, is better without the wild assortment of signs and billboards that once enticed travelers to stop at the UFO Watchtower, the Colorado Gators Reptile Park and other roadside delights.

 

Back in the day, a sequence of winsome metal aliens held American flags and signs warning motorists: “Slow Down, Aliens at Play.”

The gator farm had more than a dozen gaily painted signs, as well as a railroad boxcar and the sides of a building decorated with smiling alligators and offering directions.

 

All the signs violated Lady Bird Johnson’s Highway Beautification Act of 1965. Lady Bird disliked the hundreds of thousands of billboards that fringed the nation’s highways and byways, hawking everything from horse blankets to Burma Shave shaving cream to political causes. 
 

Keep America beautiful … burn a billboard” said author Edward Abbey in the 1960s. Congress, with a nudge from Lady Bird’s spouse, agreed that the majesty of purple mountains and rolling plains were preferable to forests of signs.

Thousands of billboards vanished after 1965, but hard lobbying by the outdoor advertising industry, 40 years of congressional amendments to the law, and no funding for enforcement left many signs standing.

Billboards in urban areas won exemptions.

 Large signs and billboards first appeared on American roads in the 1830s, promoting horse blankets, home remedies and political causes. Wall Drug in South Dakota gained international fame with thousands of signs and billboards.

When Ted Hustead bought the pharmacy in 1931, town residents numbered 231 and sales receipts were about $300 a month. His wife, Dorothy, designed signs offering free ice water.

 

Mount Rushmore opened that year on the same highway, Interstate 90. Wall Drug prospered as road-weary motorists succumbed to hundreds of miles of signs advertising cowboy boots, free ice water, Indian-made moccasins and much more along the long, lonesome highway.

 

Wall Drug also installed signs all over the world — London, Kenya, Paris, Rome, Korea, Easter Island and Asia. One in Antarctica declared, “10,645 miles to Wall Drug.”

 

The billboard-based success of Wall Drug and other companies birthed the nationwide blight that Lady Bird loathed.
 

Today, Wall Drug is down to 280 billboards and signs in South Dakota. “We wouldn’t be in business without them,” says Rick Hustead,Ted’s grandson.

Wall Drug also hands out free bumper stickers — “Where the heck is Wall Drug?” and “Where is the world is Wall Drug?” — to spread the word about the 5-cent coffee, but Hustead says people don’t use bumper stickers like they once did.

 

In Colorado, the hardest-hit sign assortment belonged to F.M. Light, the Western wear store in Steamboat Springs that had about 300 brown and yellow signs within 150 miles of the store.

Lady Bird’s law chewed the number down to about 100 that predated the Highway Beautification Act.

Each is numbered and registered with the state. F.M. Light’s oldest sign dates back to 1911.

 

Over the years, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) has gradually checked the state’s byways and enforced Lady Bird’s vision.

Fruit stands that put up signs near the major highways near Grand Junction fought the edict, but lost.

Colorado 17, in a remote and rural area, remained abloom with signs for years.

The 88½-mile road is bounded by thousands of acres of pinion and sage that rise to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the east and the San Juan Mountains to the west.

 

In 2005, CDOT started notifying business owners along Colorado 17 to take their festive signs down, said CDOT’s Nancy Shanks. Artwork and pictures were OK, but no text declaring that alligators were ahead, guiding motorists to aliens or offering directions to several commercial hot springs pools.

Resistance proved futile.

As the signs came down, business drooped despite websites, Facebook pages and brochures in nearby towns.

 

But the folks who make a living from sheltering more than 300 unwanted alligators and 100 other large reptiles, or running a UFO watch tower, or building a hot springs spa complete with a small landing strip in a desert are creative.

 

The Sand Dunes Swimming Pool, located 2½ miles east of Colorado 17, initially attached colored plastic swimming noodles and towels to blank signs and then switched to billboards painted to look like sun-dabbled water on each side of the highway, near the turn-off to the pools. Some visitors get the message; others miss the turnoff a few times, says pool manager Nancy Harmon.

 

At the gator park, gone are the green and yellow wooden alligator-shaped signs, the railroad boxcar with a grinning gator, and assorted plywood signs offering smoked alligator meat.

Now, there’s a large metal sculpture of an alligator on top of a truck.

But that’s not enough, so part owner Jay Young, who will teach you to wrestle an alligator for $100, turned to guerilla marketing.

 

The gator guys bought two large acreages on either side of the alligator farm, put up legal billboards offering the land for sale and providing the reptile refuge’s phone number and website.

The downside is that people think the alligator haven is for sale, says Young.

 

The UFO Watchtower still has a slew of welded metal aliens, but the quirky signs no longer bear signs saying “Ride the Cosmic Highway to the UFO Tower.”

 

Owner Judy Messoline says “Lots of people come in and say, ‘You guys need more signs.’ “

 

The fabled red, white and blue “Splashland” sign, featuring a buxom 1950s bathing beauty, still stands proud at the area’s first commercial swimming pool. She predates Lady Bird’s efforts and is exempt.

 

There is one recent legal billboard, painted to show the planet Earth as seen from space. The only words: Our Home Take Care.

Paul Kloppenburg put up the artwork in 2006 to cover a dilapidated real estate sign. He is a fan of Lady Bird’s beautification efforts, including billboard removal.

 

“I kept thinking when I drove by, ‘What could I do with that billboard?’ I thought about it for a lot of years.”

He decided that the image of Earth might help passersby think globally and transcend petty thoughts, he decided.

 

Would Lady Bird Johnson approve of the Earth art and the message?

Colorado Towns biggest to the smallest

 

  CITY Last Known Population     CITY Last Known Population
1 Denver, CO 663,862   1 Gunnison, CO 5,973
2 Northeast Jefferson, CO 451,811   2 Sheridan, CO 5,949
3 Colorado Springs, CO 445,830   3 Berthoud 5,807
3 Aurora, CO 353,108   4 Brush 5,466
4 South Aurora, CO 329,151   5 Salida, CO 5,406
5 West Adams, CO 310,409   6 Livermore, CO 5,370
6 Southwest Arapahoe, CO 201,720   7 Vail, CO 5,328
7 Fort Collins, CO 156,480   8 Manitou Springs 5,314
8 Lakewood, CO 149,643   9 Lochbuie 5,302
9 Thornton, CO 130,307   10 Edgewater, CO 5,289
10 Arvada, CO 113,574   11 Dove Valley 5,243
11 Westminster, CO 112,090   12 Shaw Heights 5,116
12 Pueblo, CO 108,423   13 Glendale, CO 5,115
13 Centennial, CO 107,201   14 Eaton, CO 4,815
14 Boulder, CO 105,112   15 Breckenridge, CO 4,749
15 Greeley, CO 98,596   16 Penrose-Portland 4,736
16 Highlands Ranch 96,713   17 New Castle, CO 4,608
17 Longmont 90,237   18 Dacono 4,544
18 Loveland, CO 72,651   19 Battlement Mesa 4,471
19 Broomfield 62,138   20 Monte Vista 4,311
20 Grand Junction, CO 60,210   21 Pikes Peak 4,282
21 Castle Rock, CO 55,747   22 Silverthorne 4,271
22 Commerce City 51,762   23 Mead, CO 4,104
23 Parker, CO 49,857   24 Burlington, CO 4,014
24 North Aurora, CO 48,131   25 Niwot 4,006
25 Southglenn 48,097   26 Basalt, CO 3,919
26 Littleton, CO 44,669   27 Rocky Ford, CO 3,873
27 Black Forest-Peyton 42,682   28 Florence, CO 3,852
28 Northglenn 38,596   29 West Pleasant View 3,840
29 Brighton, CO 36,765   30 El Jebel 3,801
30 Security-Widefield 32,882   31 Todd Creek 3,768
31 Englewood, CO 32,480   32 Genesee, CO 3,609
32 Ken Caryl 32,438   33 Yuma, CO 3,606
33 Dakota Ridge 32,005   34 Penrose 3,582
34 Elsmere, CO 31,567   35 Lincoln Park, CO 3,546
35 Wheat Ridge 31,034   36 Severance, CO 3,525
36 Pueblo West 29,637   37 Eagle-Vail 3,477
37 Castlewood, CO 28,255   38 Ponderosa Park 3,232
38 Fountain, CO 27,631   39 Cotopaxi 3,217
39 Lafayette, CO 27,081   40 Orchard City 3,025
40 Columbine 24,280   41 Acres Green 3,007
41 Central Jefferson 24,039   42 Silt 3,007
42 South Jefferson, CO 23,024   43 Meridian, CO 2,970
43 Windsor, CO 21,106   44 Frisco, CO 2,914
44 Erie, CO 20,493   45 Snowmass Village 2,898
45 Evans, CO 20,473   46 Walsenburg 2,896
46 Golden, CO 20,201   47 Buena Vista, CO 2,734
47 Louisville, CO 20,112   48 Palisade, CO 2,645
48 Clifton, CO 19,889   49 Platteville, CO 2,608
49 Montrose, CO 19,045   50 Leadville 2,595
50 Divide 18,488   51 Palmer Lake 2,579
51 Sherrelwood 18,287   52 Hudson, CO 2,569
52 Durango, CO 17,834   53 Bayfield, CO 2,533
53 Canon City 16,337   54 Holly Hills 2,521
54 Cimarron Hills 16,161   55 Laporte, CO 2,450
55 Greenwood Village 15,385   56 Strasburg, CO 2,447
56 Welby 14,846   57 Bennett, CO 2,443
57 Sterling, CO 14,629   58 Rangely 2,430
58 Fort Carson 13,813   59 Meeker, CO 2,429
59 Lone Tree, CO 13,545   60 Whitewater-Kahnah Creek 2,428
60 Johnstown, CO 13,306   61 Coal Creek 2,400
61 Black Forest 13,116   62 Wray 2,400
62 Superior, CO 12,855   63 Telluride 2,369
63 Fruita 12,761   64 Glade Park-Gateway 2,329
64 Southeastern El Paso 12,750   65 Holyoke, CO 2,263
65 Bald Mountain 12,449   66 Center, CO 2,199
66 Steamboat Springs 12,260   67 Las Animas 2,198
67 Federal Heights 12,178   68 Colorado City, CO 2,193
68 Firestone 11,537   69 Cedaredge 2,187
69 Fort Morgan 11,329   70 Lake George, CO 2,110
70 Berkley, CO 11,207   71 Lyons, CO 2,108
71 Cherry Creek, CO 11,120   72 Campion 2,076
72 Frederick, CO 10,927   73 La Salle, CO 2,047
73 Castle Pines 10,796   74 Timnath 1,983
74 Castle Pines North 10,602   75 Limon 1,887
75 The Pinery 10,517   76 Hayden, CO 1,837
76 Edwards, CO 10,266   77 Granby, CO 1,808
77 Glenwood Springs 9,840   78 Olathe, CO 1,804
78 Cheyenne Mountain 9,773   79 Leadville North 1,794
79 St. Charles Mesa 9,675   80 Pagosa Springs 1,743
80 Alamosa 9,531   81 Idaho Springs 1,710
81 Rifle 9,488   82 Akron, CO 1,694
82 Gunbarrel 9,263   83 Cascade-Chipita Park 1,655
83 Roxborough Park 9,099   84 Perry Park 1,646
84 Evergreen, CO 9,038   85 Del Norte 1,629
85 Stonegate 8,962   86 Weston, CO 1,617
86 Craig, CO 8,846   87 Ault 1,603
87 Woodmoor 8,741   88 Ute Mountain 1,591
88 Delta, CO 8,720   89 Kersey, CO 1,560
89 Redlands, CO 8,685   90 Crested Butte 1,541
90 Cortez, CO 8,602   91 Inverness, CO 1,532
91 East Arapahoe 8,415   92 Carriage Club 1,511
92 Trinidad, CO 8,193   93 Nederland, CO 1,504
93 Fort Lupton 7,783   94 Alamosa East 1,458
94 Derby, CO 7,685   95 Paonia 1,413
95 Fruitvale, CO 7,675   96 Springfield, CO 1,405
96 Lamar, CO 7,608   97 Cottonwood, CO 1,404
97 Fairmount, CO 7,559   98 Kremmling 1,404
98 Kersey-Gill 7,273   99 Elizabeth, CO 1,395
99 Woodland Park, CO 7,194   100 Mountain Village, CO 1,387
100 Wellington, CO 7,185   101 Mancos 1,377
101 Applewood 7,160   102 Aristocrat Ranchettes 1,344
102 La Junta 6,964   103 Columbine Valley 1,328
103 Stratmoor 6,900   104 Kittredge 1,304
104 Orchard Mesa 6,836   105 Loma, CO 1,293
105 Aspen 6,805   106 Indian Hills, CO 1,280
106 Gypsum, CO 6,797   107 Julesburg 1,211
107 East Adams 6,755   108 Keenesburg 1,191
108 Air Force Academy 6,680   109 Cripple Creek 1,172
109 Gleneagle 6,611   110 Sargent, CO 1,166
110 Carbondale, CO 6,574   111 Fraser, CO 1,165
111 Eagle, CO 6,572   112 Byers, CO 1,160
112 Avon, CO 6,447   113 Fowler, CO 1,155
113 Cherry Hills Village 6,423   114 Mosca-Hooper 1,155
114 Monument, CO 6,391   115 Ellicott, CO 1,131
115 Estes Park 6,165   116 Huerfano Valley 1,106
116 Grand Valley 6,111   117 Parachute 1,098
117 Twin Lakes, CO 6,101   118 Towaoc 1,087
118 Milliken 6,091   119 Gilcrest 1,080
119       120 Keystone, CO 1,079
        121 Upper St. Vrain 1,063
        122 Ordway 1,059
        123 Upper Bear Creek 1,059
        124 Georgetown, CO 1,038
        125 Minturn, CO 1,035
        126 Ouray 1,021
        127 South Divide 1,020